Tag Archives: moles

Toxins: Mystery Solutions

For class today, students will watch Life’s Rocky Start from NOVA.  While watching the video, students will complete a worksheet to help them identify the key learning from throughout the video.  The worksheet should be turned in at the end of class.

Update: May 10 – thank you to Mrs. C for substituting for me yesterday.  The students were in her capable hands and did a great job staying engaged through the video.  For today, students worked through the Lesson 83 Worksheet.  We approached Part 1 as a thought experiment and notes from the whiteboard are pictured below.  The Lesson 83 PowerPoint is included for reference.

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Toxins: Molecular Views

Our work today involved thinking about solutions from a molecular perspective.  Students briefly reviewed yesterday’s Gummy Bear portion of the lab via the ChemCatalyst on slide 3 of the Lesson 81 PowerPoint.  Students then received the Lesson 81 Worksheet and the Particle Views Handout.  The handout was used in Part 1 of the worksheet.  For Part 2, students assembled into groups and gathered around lab stations to gain experience diluting a 3.0 M stock solution to a 1.5 M solution.  They also observed how two different volumes of a solution with the same concentration both appear the same color.  The lesson helped illustrate the connection between molarity (M), particle density, and the number of moles (particle number) in a solution.  Pictures from the white board are shown below.

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Toxins: Mass-Mole Conversions

Lesson 78 provided students with additional practice converting from mass to moles and from moles to mass.  The Lesson 78 PowerPoint ChemCatalyst activity asked students to predict whether arsenic (As), arsenic oxide (As2O3), or arsenic sulfide (As2S3) was most toxic.  Students had to consider how many atoms of arsenic are in each molecule, and which has more molecules in a fixed mass.  Some of the work from the entry task is shown below:

For the Lesson 78 Worksheet, students worked in pairs to complete the questions.  For homework, students were assigned questions 5-8 from the textbook.

Weather: Ideal Gas Law

After several lessons learning about the component parts and relationships mathematically connecting pressure, volume, temperature, and number of particles, the Ideal Gas Law was revealed.  We worked through the Lesson 64 worksheet and then watched a Crash Course video on the Ideal Gas Law:

After the video, we worked through Lesson 65 textbook problems 3 and 5.  The notes from the white board are shown below.  The Lesson 65 PowerPoint and Lesson 65 Worksheet are available for students who would like to see them.  We did not use either today in class, and the Lesson 65 Worksheet was not assigned.