Tag Archives: Mitosis

EOC Review: Unit 4 Review / Research and Explore

With several students in each of my classes absent because of the Algebra EOC, we used the class period to review a variety of concepts up through Unit 4.  Students reviewed the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles by reviewing posters they had made earlier in the school year.  For students who were absent, an example of one poster is provided below:

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We also reviewed genetics (vocabulary, single-trait Punnett Squares, and dihybrid crosses) along with mitosis, meiosis, and fertilization.

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Students in attendance also received a copy of the EOC-style writing prompt called Research and Explore.  We spent a few minutes discussing the prompt and looking at the rubric, and students are welcome to practice working through the prompt as homework.  The prompt will not be collected as homework.

Meiosis and Inheritance: Comparing Mitosis and Meiosis

With many students out of class because of three different field trips happening today, we had to reschedule our quiz for tomorrow.  For a starter activity today, students received a worksheet instructing them to write a paragraph comparing mitosis and meiosis, using 10 different key vocabulary words in their paragraph.  Students who finished early had time to complete missing assignments.

Notes from the white board after 5th period are shown below:

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Mitosis: Introduction to Mitosis – Part 2

Class began with an example of why mitosis is important: a video showing how salamanders can regenerate lost limbs:

After the video, we worked through a PowerPoint providing students with important vocabulary related to mitosis, with images related to the vocabulary to help reinforce student learning.  Students were encouraged to memorize “PMAT” – an acronym for Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, and Telophase which may prove useful on the Biology EOC.  We also discussed the difference between the Washington State Science Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards governing mitosis.  Although Washington State has adopted the NGSS, students are still tested on the WSSS and therefore must navigate between both worlds.  The WSSS (9-11 LS1H) expects students to describe and model the process of mitosis, in which one cell divides, producing two cells, each with copies of both chromosomes from each pair in the original cell.  The NGSS mitosis standard (HS-LS1-4) requires that students use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.  To help students achieve mastery of the content standards, students were introduced to the Mitosis Project.  The final slide of the project includes a list of 12 different projects for students (working alone or in pairs) to chose from.  Students learned a bit about each project and then had time to decide which project they would like to pursue.  We will formally launch the project tomorrow.

Central Dogma: Introduction to Mitosis

After wrapping up our work for now on the Chromosome Project, we transitioned to studying how cells divide.  Mitosis, or somatic cell division, involves the division of one cell into two after all of the components of the original cell (including the DNA!) divide into two sets.  We began by watching a Crash Course video about mitosis:

After the video, students were assigned to read pages 46-51 of chapter 4 (Cellular Reproduction: Multiplication By Division) of Inside the Cell.   Students then answered the following questions in their lab notebooks:

  1. Explain the purpose of mitosis.
  2. Which cells undergo mitosis?
  3. Describe the phases of mitosis in detail (words and/or drawings).
  4. Explain what happens when cells divide uncontrollably.  List the known causes of uncontrolled cell division.

This unit is focused specifically on NGSS Standard HS-LS1-4Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms. Students have previously been assessed on their understanding of how cellular expression of specific gene products (proteins) can result in unique cell types, and groups of unique cell types can form tissues.  Students learned about body structure and organization during Unit 3, including the organization of cells into tissues and organs.  In this mini-unit, students will be able to clearly connect the process of mitosis (cell division) with tissue organization and organism development.

Mitosis: Introduction to mitosis – Day 2

We kicked off the class period with an engaging science video from Late Night with Jimmy Fallon:

We then launched in to a continuation of Friday’s introduction to mitosis (click here for the slides).  Students reviewed their notes from the reading to discuss the entry task.  Next, students learned some key vocabulary terms for understanding and discussing mitosis.  Finally, we ended class with a Crash Course video about mitosis:

Students interested in learning more about the molecular biology of mitosis should check out this TED Talk from Drew Berry:

Mitosis: Introduction to mitosis – day 1

Today we launched into the study of mitosis by reading the first several pages of chapter 4 (Cellular Reproduction: Multiplication By Division) of Inside the Cell.   With the short class periods today, students were tasked with reading pages 46-51 and answering the following questions in their lab notebooks:

  1. Explain the purpose of mitosis.
  2. Which cells undergo mitosis?
  3. Describe the phases of mitosis in detail (words and drawings).
  4. Explain what happens when cells divide uncontrollably.  List the known causes of uncontrolled cell division.

This unit is focused specifically on NGSS Standard HS-LS1-4Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.  Students have previously been assessed on their understanding of how cellular expression of specific gene products (proteins) can result in unique cell types, and groups of unique cell types can form tissues.  Students learned about body structure and organization during Unit 3, including the organization of cells into tissues and organs.  In this mini-unit, students will be able to clearly connect the process of mitosis (cell division) with tissue organization and organism development.

Genetics Unit – Lesson 6

Today we had a lively discussion of the effects of nature and nurture on various traits.  We realized that the information encoded in our genes might make us appear and think a certain way, and yet our environment also plays an important role in making us who we are.  The discussion transitioned to Lesson 6: mitosis and meiosis.  Our previous emphasis on DNA replication and the vocabulary associated with the project from Lesson 1, coupled with the videos of DNA replication from Lesson 2, all created the foundation for readily understanding cell division.