Tag Archives: chromosome project

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project

Update: March 2

Today marks the final day of class time for working on this portion of the Chromosome Project.  After our entry task, students who have completed the project will be offered the opportunity to present their work to the class for feedback.  For those who finish early, please complete The New Genetics reading assignment (Chapter 1) from February 9.  When that assignment is complete, the next reading assignment is Chapter 4 from Inside the Cell (define vocabulary words in bold and answer the questions at the end of the chapter).  Notes from the entry task are shown below:

Update: March 1

A complete presentation will have the following sections:

  1. Information connecting Chromosome, DNA, Gene, Protein, and Trait (Disease/Condition)
  2. Information about Disease/Condition
  3. Researcher = Your Name
  4. Research connection between Gene and Disease/Condition
  5. How is the disease/condition inherited? Are the genetics known?
  6. Update references in APA format

Use the Citation Machine website to help you cite your sources using APA format.  Sources need to be referenced on the last slide of the Google Slides document you are working on.

Original Post: February 25

Welcome to the Chromosome Project!  Yesterday you had the opportunity to research one or more genes known to be involved in a genetic disease or condition of interest to you.  You then located the gene on a particular chromosome.

Now your work begins!  Your mission today is to learn as much as you can about the gene you identified yesterday.  Record your findings in the Daily Log located in Google Classroom.

To research your gene, visit the NCBI Human Genome Resources page and enter your gene name into the “Find a Gene” box on the left panel.  Be sure to select “homo sapiens” in the pull-down box.  When the search completes, click on your gene name (typically the first gene on the list) and browse through the entry.  There is a ton of information provided!  The length of the gene can be found by hovering your mouse over the top green line under the “genomic regions, transcripts, and products” and looking for the number after the word “length.”  The length of the amino acid sequence can be found by clicking on the word “protein” on the right hand side of the page under Related Information.  Browse the entries for the full-length protein and note the number of amino acids in the protein.  The full-length protein can be challenging to find: look for an entry that does not include words like truncatedisoformpredicted, synthetic construct, or unnamed protein product.

Another great website to visit to learn more about specific genes is GeneCards.org.  Just type your gene name into the “Explore a Gene” search box and appreciate the power of the Internet!  NCBI PubMed contains a huge database of scientific papers – search for your gene and see what articles are out there.

You can use all of this information to edit the Chromosome Project Template Slides also located in Google Classroom.  If time permits, continue researching the disease/condition you selected.  Your goal is to learn what you can about what the disease/condition is and how it is inherited.

Welcome to research!  Use your time well and challenge yourself to learn new things!

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project – Reflection

Due to our aging technology infrastructure, many students were unable to complete their chromosome projects on Wednesday.  With all science teachers together at a district-wide meeting, the substitute will provide students with the following work options:

In order of priority:

  1. Complete the Chromosome Project and email it to me (the PowerPoint and Activity Logs).
  2. Complete and turn in Chromosome Project reflection worksheet (copies on table under blackboard).
  3. Complete and turn in Unit 4 exam and Unit 5 quiz revisions.
  4. Check grades in Illuminate, identify missing assignments, locate missing assignments on the class website, print the work, complete it, and turn it in.
  5. Complete extra credit reading.

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project – Day 4

Today is the fourth and final day of working in the computer lab on the Chromosome Project.  Please download and complete the Day 4 Activity Log.  Students who complete the project before the end of the class period should share their expertise with classmates who would benefit from some additional help.  Remember, the purpose of this project is for each student to identify one disease caused by one gene on one chromosome.  Students are gaining a vast array of skills, including:

  • Using NCBI to research chromosomes, genes, and proteins;
  • Effective using the Internet searches research human diseases or conditions caused by inappropriate gene expression;
  • Applying project management skills to break down a large project into smaller units (the daily activity logs);
  • Working with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint to document and share learning;
  • Self-sufficiency by visiting the class website daily, and then reading and following complex written instructions;
  • Teamwork by sharing learning strategies with classmates working through similar learning challenges.

I am very proud of the work I have seen students accomplish over three short days.  Students have been presented with a variety of scheduling challenges, and several have also dealt with technological challenges.  I am impressed with the perseverance of my students and look forward to seeing their finished projects.

**Update: Because of the continued technology challenges, the final PowerPoint project is now worth 50 points, with additional credit awarded for presentations (+10 extra credit) and group participation (+10 extra credit) during presentations.  The reflection assignment (+10) was separately graded as well.

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project – Day 3

After two days in the computer lab, students should have compiled enough information for their Chromosome Project to complete page 1 of the PowerPoint template (goal #1).  Next, download and complete the Day 3 Activity Log.  The major focus of today is to identify credible scientific resources and find the information necessary to complete slides 2 and 3 of the PowerPoint.

  • Symptoms and characteristics of the disease/condition:
    • How does someone know they have the disease/condition?
    • What body systems are affected and how?
    • What tests are used to detect the disease/condition?
  • Who is affected?  Who is at risk for having the disease/condition
  • Outlook or quality of life:
    • What happens if the disease/condition goes untreated?
    • What treatment options are currently available?
    • How does treatment affect the disease/condition?
    • What treatment options may be available in the future?

Project scoring update: Many students were unable to locate their Day 1 Activity Log files, suggesting a problem with the student drives.  Out of fairness, the grading rubric will be updated as follows:

  • Minimum of 3 Daily Logs: 10 points per log (30 points total)
  • PowerPoint slides (50 points total)
  • Reflection (10 points)
  • Audience participation during presentations (10 points)
  • Presentation of PowerPoint (10 points of extra credit)

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project – Day 2

Students should download and complete the Day 2 Activity Log to document progress on the chromosome project, saving it to their student drive.  Please review the project description and grading rubric by visiting last Thursday’s post.

Ready to research a specific gene?  Head over to the NCBI Human Genome Resources page and enter your gene name into the “Find a Gene” box on the left panel.  Be sure to select “homo sapiens” in the pull-down box.  When the search completes, click on your gene name (typically the first gene on the list) and browse through the entry.  There is a ton of information provided!  The length of the gene can be found by hovering your mouse over the top green line under the “genomic regions, transcripts, and products” and looking for the number after the word “length.”  The length of the amino acid sequence can be found by clicking on the word “protein” on the right hand side of the page under Related Information.  Browse the entries for the full-length protein and note the number of amino acids in the protein.  The full-length protein can be challenging to find: look for an entry that does not include words like truncated, isoformpredicted, synthetic construct, or unnamed protein product.

Central Dogma: Chromosome Project – Day 1

For this individual student project, please download the following documents:

Additional example slides can be viewed here.  For this project, you will research diseases or health conditions associated with specific genes on the chromosome you have been assigned.  NCBI’s Human Genome Resources website is an excellent place to begin researching which genes are on your assigned chromosome.  Use the template and replace the existing information with your own research.  Add additional slides as needed.  Keep track of all of your work in the activity log.  You will have a new log each day and will turn in the logs along with your PowerPoint project slides next Wednesday (March 4).

Project Grading:

  • Daily Log: 10 points per log (40 points total)
  • PowerPoint slides (50 points total)
  • Reflection (10 points)
  • Presentation (10 points of extra credit)

Want to work on your project from home but need access to Microsoft PowerPoint?  Remember, as students of Highline School District, you already have a free copy of Microsoft Office 365 available for you to download and install on your home computer!  Visit https://login.microsoftonline.com/ and sign in with your school login information.