Category Archives: Chemistry

Combustion Lab

Class began with a reminder that all work from lessons 70-73 (chapter 13) must be turned in at the start of class on Monday morning for full credit.

For our work today, we reviewed the combustion of propane and balanced the equation, then carried out an experiment in which a candle (made of paraffin wax, another hydrocarbon) is combusted under a bell jar.  We timed how long the candle burned for, and also measured the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the room (before combustion) and under the bell jar (after the candle extinguished).

Next, we wrote the chemical equations for combining hydrogen peroxide and bleach (producing oxygen) and for combining baking soda and vinegar (producing carbon dioxide).  We evaluated the effect of combustion in the presence of excess oxygen or carbon dioxide, measuring how long the candle burned as our endpoint.

School Closed – Coronavirus

Updated Monday, April 6

Dear Students,

This afternoon, Governor Inslee made the call to keep school buildings closed through the end of the school year.  To help answer the many questions you must have, please visit our school district’s web page regarding the closure due to COVID-19.  There is a link at the bottom of the page to ask questions through a ThoughtExchange.

This week is Spring Break.  Get lots of rest.  Finish any last missing assignments.  Be prepared to start 4th quarter ready to learn via distance learning.  Let’s embrace this challenge and make the most of the time we have left together this school year!  To those of you who attended the practice Zoom session last Friday, I promised you I would share information as it became available.  Here is what I know so far:

    • Tuesdays are new Science learning days.  New Chemistry lessons will be posted each week on Monday mornings at 8:00 (in case you want to get ahead!)
    • Work for the week is due by Sunday at 11:59pm after the Tuesday it was assigned.
    • Office hours will take place through Zoom meetings on Tuesdays (11am-12pm) and Thursdays (1pm-2pm).  You will receive meeting instructions to your student Gmail before each meeting.  Attendance is optional but encouraged.
    • Check your student Gmail account daily.  Email me any time with any questions, comments, or concerns you have.
    • The Honors option will be available for 2nd semester.  Now that we have confirmation, I will be working out the details for the loosely outlined project in my original post.  Again, thank you for your patience and stay tuned.
    • I have reconfigured the Chemistry section of our class website to reflect the reality of distance learning.  Wondering about labs?  Me too!  We’ve got couple we will try to pull off from a distance – put purple cabbage on the shopping list the first week of June.  You will need it for Week 38.

As always, please reach out with any comments/questions/concerns.  Stay well, stay home, and see you soon.

Mr. Swart

 


Originally published March 13

Dear Students,

With the sudden closure of all schools across our region, we didn’t have the chance for a real goodbye or to discuss plans for how to keep things going outside of school.  My hope is that you will make the most of your time away from school and keep your brains active and engaged.

  • Students who wish to improve current grades: Use Synergy to identify missing assignments, then locate those assignments here.  Complete the work, then email me a picture of what you have completed.  All missing work will be awarded a maximum of 60% credit.  Email with any questions or to obtain copies of assignments that cannot be posted online.
  • Students who wish to earn bonus credit: Contribute to the STEAM Punks section of this website.  Pick a topic, explore it in depth, then write up your findings into a post that can be linked to one of the STEAM sections.  Wondering how to begin?  Visit the post on Sleep for an example of what your post might look like – you are limited only by your imagination!
  • Students who wish to earn Honors credit: Read about the Flint, Michigan water crisis caused by lead-contaminated drinking water.  Then, research another human-caused environmental / public health crisis caused by toxic chemicals.  National Geographic is a good starting point to learn about existing Superfund sites in the United States.  More details about project expectations to come.  Update: The Honors project is on hold until we receive confirmation that students will be allowed to earn an Honors credit for second semester.  
  • Please check back frequently for updates.  We will know by Thursday (March 19) about district support for teachers providing students with sustained distance learning opportunities.  I am unbelievably proud of the progress my students have made this year in chemistry.  My intent is to continue to use this space to post lessons to support continued learning, with the complete understanding that this work is for enrichment and understanding, not for grading.  See above to address and/or remedy current grades.  Please reach out via Synergy email or through the About Me comment section here at any time with questions, comments, or concerns.
  • Highline Public Schools – Closure Announcement
  • Meals for students during school closure
  • Need Internet access at home?

Stay well,

Mr. Swart

Types of Reactions

For the final lesson of chapter 13, students learned to classify the types of reactions as combination, decomposition, single exchange, or double exchange reactions.

  • Combination: A + B -> C
  • Decomposition: A -> B + C
  • Single Exchange: AB + C -> A + BC
  • Double Exchange: AB + CD -> AD + CD

We focused primarily slide 8 of the Lesson 73 PowerPoint.  Students are encouraged to review the full slide deck, including the vocabulary defined on slides 9-12.  Students then received the Lesson 73 Worksheet and Toxic Reaction Cards to work on for the remainder of class.  As an alternative, students who self-assessed as needing additional practice balancing equations were offered the opportunity to work through the Balancing Equations Gizmo.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 73 in the textbook.  Log in and enter your username and password:
    • Username: full student gmail address.
    • Password: HighlineMM/DD (student birthday, use leading zero if needed, i.e. March 7 = 03/07)
    • Forgot your password?  Click here to reset your password.  Enter your student gmail address and follow the instructions.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 73.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 73 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th)

Balancing Chemical Equations

Entry Task

Class began with the ChemCatalyst from the Lesson 72 PowerPoint.  With the lesson focusing on balancing chemical equations, we worked through the ChemCatalyst equation with a focus on differentiating coefficients and subscripts (slides 11 and 12).  We used the remainder of the class period to practice balancing equations.

For day 2, students worked through the Balancing Chemical Equations Gizmo.

Extra Practice!

For students who would like additional instruction around balancing equations and enjoy learning by watching videos, I recommend Tyler DeWitt’s videos Introduction to Balancing Equations (above) and Balancing Chemical Equation Practice Problems (below):

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 72 in the textbook.  Log in and enter your username and password:
    • Username: full student gmail address.
    • Password: HighlineMM/DD (student birthday, use leading zero if needed, i.e. March 7 = 03/07)
    • Forgot your password?  Click here to reset your password.  Enter your student gmail address and follow the instructions.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 72.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 72 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th)

Physical versus Chemical Change

For our introductory lesson of Unit 4, we revisited the concepts of physical and chemical change in the context of chemical reactions.  The lesson began with a series of demonstrations.  Students were tasked with recording observations and then determining whether a chemical or physical change had taken place.

Notes from class:

Next, students watched the following video from Mr. Anderson of Bozeman Science, with the expectation that they can clearly articulate the difference between a chemical and physical change by the end of the video.

After the video, we reviewed the vocabulary of chemical reactions (inputs/reactants and outputs/products) and then students had the remainder of the class period to complete the Lesson 70 Worksheet.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 70 in the textbook.  Log in and enter your username and password:
    • Username: full student gmail address.
    • Password: HighlineMM/DD (student birthday, use leading zero if needed, i.e. March 7 = 03/07)
    • Forgot your password?  Click here to reset your password.  Enter your student gmail address and follow the instructions.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 70.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 70 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th)

 

Gas Laws Mini-Unit Exam Part 2

For the Day 2 of the Unit 3 Exam, students are tasked with using the Ideal Gas Law to explain how methane bubbles originating on the ocean floor change as they travel to the surface.  Methane gas is explosive, and might be one reason ship are lost in the Bermuda Triangle.

The temperature at the ocean floor is 0°C.  The pressure at the ocean floor is 35 atm.  The size of methane gas bubbles has been determined using sound.  Read the article Audio Reveals Sizes of Methane Bubbles Rising from the Seafloor and locate the information about the size distribution of bubbles.  The team reports that bubbles range in size from a few millimeters (mm) to a few centimeters (cm).  Once you find the actual numbers reported, enter them into the Google Form corresponding to your class period.

The exam ends when the bell rings.