Attractions between Molecules

Thursday, December 19: We ended 2019 with an introduction to Lesson 42: Attraction Between Molecules.  For our entry task, students watched the Crash Course video below:

After the video, students worked on the Polarity and Intermolecular Forces Gizmo which will be due on Monday, January 6, 2020.

Monday, January 6: We began the year with a new student-selected seating chart.  While students arranged themselves, they received back the Chapter 7 quiz from December 18.  We then reviewed the quiz with students sharing out answers.  Next, we reviewed the concept of polarity and intermolecular forces (class notes shown below).  Finally, students had the remainder of the class period to complete the Gizmo, complete the Lesson 41 molecule poster project, and to read lessons 42 and 43 in the textbook and answer the lesson exercises.

Lesson 42 Picture 1

Lesson 42 Picture 2

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 42 in the textbook.  Login via the Sapling website and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 42 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 42
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 42 you do not yet fully understand.

Week 16

Monday, December 16, 2019: As we enter the final week of school for 2019, today marks the final day of completing and turning in all missing work.

All students should complete the Winter Break Kahoot! Prep Google Form so we can celebrate the end of the calendar year in style!

Students who are completely caught up should take the opportunity to review our work thus far in Unit 2, analyze their biogeochemical cycling posters (using the grading rubric), discuss ideas, and ask questions.


Tuesday, December 17, 2019: In preparation for the mid-unit 2 quiz tomorrow, we will review our work from unit 2, culminating with an analysis of the biogeochemical cycling posters.


Wednesday, December 18, 2019: Mid-Unit 2 Quiz

 


Thursday, December 19, 2019 (NGSS on pages 10-12): King County EcoConnections Biospheres workshop hosted by Jennifer Scales


Friday, December 20, 2019: Winter Break Kahoot!

Receptor Site Theory

For our final lesson of Chapter 7, we began with the TED-Ed video below to review the process of how we smell:

The Lesson 41 PowerPoint includes the key vocabulary concept of receptor site theory, where students learn the importance of molecule shape in determining recognition by receptor molecules involved in sensing smell.

Work for today (+10 assignment category bonus points for finished poster, due Monday, January 6, 2020):

  1. Complete the Winter Break Kahoot! Prep Google Form (for a fun Friday!)
  2. Research the molecule responsible for your favorite smell.  Example: limonene is the compound that gives orange peels their smell (CompoundChem has a huge list of aroma chemistry infographics)
  3. View the molecule on MolView.
  4. Research whether the olfactory receptor is known for the molecule.  A list of smell molecules and their olfactory receptors is located at OlfactionDB. For limonene, the olfactory receptors are coded for by the genes Olfr56 (mouse) and OR2V1 (human).
  5. Make a poster (8.5″ x 11″ paper)!  Your poster should include:
  • the name of the molecule
  • the structure
  • the smell
  • the name of the olfactory receptor (if known)

Keep Learning!

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 41 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 41 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 41
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 41 you do not yet fully understand.

Shape and Smell

For Lesson 40, students worked in small groups to organize a set of 24 cards containing compounds with different shapes and functional groups.  The Lesson 40 PowerPoint includes a nice graphic organizer for studying the relationship between molecule name and functional group.  The Lesson 40 Worksheet and Card Sort are available for download.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 40 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 40 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 40.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 40 you do not yet fully understand.

Space-Filling Models

Click here to take the Pop Quiz!

After completing the quiz, read and follow the steps below:

  1. Read Lesson 39 in the textbook (pages 200-202).  Use a paper copy of the text or try logging in to the digital textbook (instructions at the bottom of this post).
  2. Write the definition for Space-Filling Model in your Chapter 7 Notes.  The definition is in the glossary (page G-20).
  3. Write a short summary of what you think are the most important things to remember from what you read in Lesson 39.
  4. Use MolView, a free molecular modeling software program available online, to search for the molecules shown in Lesson 39.  To begin, type methyl octanoate into the search bar to see the structure.
  5. Rotate the ball-and-stick model around by clicking and dragging the molecule.
  6. Use the Models > Representations menu and select the van der Waals Spheres option.  How does the ball-and-stick model compare with the van der Waals Spheres model?
  7. Repeat the process with the other molecules shown in Lesson 39.
  8. Research the name of the molecule responsible for your own favorite smell.  Can you find it in MolView?

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 39 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 39 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 39.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 39 you do not yet fully understand.

Pop Quiz Answers (Shhhhh!!!!)

IMG_0659

IMG_0660

Molecular Shape

We returned to the molecular modeling kits in Lesson 38, this time using the kits to learn about the shape of molecules.  We worked through the Lesson 38 PowerPoint, learning vocabulary terms to describe molecular shape.  Students then worked in small groups to complete the Lesson 38 Worksheet.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 38 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 38 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 38.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 38 you do not yet fully understand.

Week 15

Monday, December 9, 2019 (HS-LS2-3, HS-LS2-5): Continue Biogeochemical Cycling Poster Project

For the project, students will create a poster to model the water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur cycles on a poster of Yellowstone National Park.  For our work today, students will have time to complete the Food Web and Ecosystem Gizmos from Monday and Tuesday, and then they will receive the Nutrient Cycling POGIL worksheet packet that will provide them with additional information about the process of carbon (C), water (H and O), and nitrogen (N) cycling.

Students will work in groups of 3-4 to create the biogeochemical cycling poster project.  Instructions:

  1. Create a large poster by taping together printer paper to the desired size
  2. Draw an accurate and scaled map of Yellowstone National Park
  3. Sketch and label the major must-see attractions and geographically distinct regions of the park
  4. Draw and label the carbon (C), water (H and O), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) cycles within the park

The poster should be nicely organized, easy to understand, and colorful!  Due date: Thursday (December 12) by the end of class.

Note 1: While not included in the POGIL, sulfur is often included as a component of the biogeochemical cycle, frequently abbreviated as the CHNOPS cycle.  Including the sulfur cycle will earn group members bonus points.

Note 2: As with the Unit 1 Ocean Acidification project, students are expected to work productively and equally within their groups.  On Tuesday, students will fill out the Individual Contribution Multiplier worksheet to to explain how each team member contributed.  The multiplier will affect individual student grades on the team project, so students must communicate early and often regarding expectations for each other.

Helpful Resources:

One Strange Rock: Nitrogen Cycle

Crash Course: Carbon and Water Cycles

Crash Course: Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles

Bozeman Science: Biogeochemical Cycles (includes the Sulfur Cycle)

The Carbon Cycle – a NASA Earth Observatory website with data about global carbon cycling in the land, air, and sea with actual numbers that need to be added to the student posters.

Water Cycle – USGS website providing a robust review of hydrologic (water) cycle vocabulary, a presentation of the cycle itself, and data students will need to add the actual amount of water stored in various locations on Earth.

Texas A&M University has a website with pages devoted to explaining the Nitrogen Cycle.  Additional in-depth information about the Nitrogen Cycle is available on the Nature Education Knowledge Project website.

Phosphorus Cycle – information about the cycle and a nice graphic from the Shmoop University website.

Sulfur Cycle – a presentation provided by The Environmental Literacy Council

Example poster


Tuesday, December 10, 2019 (HS-LS2-3, HS-LS2-5): Continue Biogeochemical Cycling Poster Project

Due: Nutrient Cycling POGIL (individual assignment)


Wednesday, December 11, 2019: Continue Biogeochemical Cycling Poster Project


Thursday, December 12, 2019: Complete Biogeochemical Cycling Poster Project

Due: Biogeochemical Cycling Poster (group assignment)

Poster Example:


Friday, December 13, 2019: Solidarity Days

Electron Domains and Molecular Shape

Our lesson today combines textbook lesson 37 (electron domains) and lesson 38 (molecule shape).  We will work through the PowerPoint and students will concurrently take notes on the Handout for this lesson while also building molecules with molecular modeling kits.  Students will then complete the Lesson 38 Worksheet.

Key ideas:

  • noble gases (single atoms) are visualized as points
  • molecules consisting of two atoms (i.e. hydrogen fluoride) are linear
  • molecules consisting of three atoms can be bent (H2O) or linear (CO2)
  • molecules consisting of four atoms, like ammonia (NH3) are called pyramidal
  • molecules consisting of five atoms, like methane (CH4) are called tetrahedral
  • larger molecules consist of multiple shapes put together

Homework:

  • Read Lessons 37 and 38 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lessons 37 and 38 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lessons 37 and 38.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lessons 37 and 38 you do not yet fully understand.

Ball-and-Stick Models

For the first lesson of Chapter 7, students applied the 3-dimensional ball-and-stick model to bridge the concepts of molecular shape, functional groups, and smell.  The Lesson 36 PowerPoint introduced students to the model, during which time they passed around actual models constructed with molecular modeling kits.  Next, students transitioned to the activity portion of the lesson, experiencing the scents of five different compounds, connecting the smells to molecular structure, and recording observations and analysis responses in the Lesson 36 Worksheet.

Exit Task: Graphing Practice #1

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 36 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password.
  • Write notes for Lesson 36 and work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 36.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 36 you do not yet fully understand.