Gas Pressure Lab

Our work today involves revisiting the gas pressure lab from last week (handout available in class), with an emphasis on:

  • Working efficiently in class
  • Cultivating relationships with new seat partners
  • Acquiring robust experimental data for each part of the activity (robust = pressure of >100 for each data point)
  • Average = (Trial 1 + Trial 2) / 2
  • Robust analysis that includes evidence obtained from the lab.  Keep asking yourself “why?” and then include “because” statements.  You have reached the limit of your understanding when you run out of “because” statements.

HHS Days of Respect Student Survey (2nd period) – Available in both English and Spanish

Bonus Learning (and Credit) Opportunities!

With more snow in the forecast, it is possible we will miss additional school days next week.  Here are a bunch of ways you can score bonus credit – up to and including dropping your first mini-quiz score!  Disclaimer: all work must be original, with sources cited using APA format (Citation Machine can help!)

  1. Make a video of one of the three Gas Pressure Lab activities.  Explain what the activity is modeling, how the data were collected, what the results were, and deeply analyze the results in the context of n, T, V, and P.  Videos must be posted to YouTube and the link emailed to Mr. Swart.  Quality video submissions will earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz (max of 3 people/team).  Winning videos will be linked to the class website and team members will have the option of bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  2. Make a poster of one of the four Gas Laws we have learned so far (Avogadro’s Law, Boyle’s Law, Charles’ Law, and Gay-Lussac’s Law).  Poster most include the name of the law, the equation, trends (example: as Pressure increases, Volume decreases), and an example problem with the solution.  The poster must be colorful and big enough for the name of the law and the equation to be seen from across the room.  Quality posters will earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz (max of 2 people/team).  Winning posters will be displayed in class and team members will have the option of bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  3. Get creative!  Write a piece of fiction, create a game, code a spreadsheet, paint a picture, you name it!   Explain one or more of the gas laws using your creativity to help make our work engaging for others.   Quality original work will be displayed in class and team members (3/group max) will have the option of adding 3 bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  4. Get analytical!  Find a moment from your life experience, your favorite book, movie, video game, etc.  Write at least one solid paragraph explaining the moment as it relates to one or more of the gas laws and earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz.
  5. Investigate the scientists behind the gas laws.  Who were Avogadro, Boyle, Charles, and Gay-Lussac?  Write a brief biography of one or more of these scientists explaining  when and where they lived, what led them into science, how they discovered their laws, and what additional contributions they made to science.  Finally, explain at least one specific way that scientist’s gas law has improved our understanding of the world or contributed to a technological innovation.  Quality submissions earn +1 bonus point per scientist on the last mini-quiz.  Submissions must be your own writing and references must be cited using APA format to earn credit.  Need help with citations?  Try Citation Machine.

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