Ideal Gas Law Lab

After reviewing and practicing the Ideal Gas Law yesterday, it was time to put theory to action!  We worked through the Lesson 65 Worksheet which included a lab designed to demonstrate the ideal gas law.  In the lab, students were divided into 8 teams and then worked together to calculate the volume of air in a breath (lung capacity).

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 65 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 65.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 65 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th in Room 124)

 

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The Mole and Avogadro’s Law

Friday, February 22: We concluded our learning for the week with Lesson 64 of our textbook: The Mole and Avogadro’s Law.  We worked through slides 5-7 of the Lesson 64 PowerPoint and then students received the Lesson 64 Worksheet to work through in small groups.  Students were instructed to complete the worksheet as homework over the weekend.


Monday, February 25: Our study of the mole and Avogadro’s number will continue today and tomorrow as students return from ELPA testing.  For our lesson today, we began with a review of dimensional analysis by way of also reviewing phase changes.  The diagram below illustrates the connection between the three phases of matter commonly encountered on Earth, and the vocabulary associated with changing phase.  Click on the image to learn a whole lot more about the science of phase change.

To help students visualize the least familiar of the phase change reactions (the solid-to-gas and gas-to-solid phase changes), we watched a brief video below, complete with spooky soundtrack:

Next, we investigated the concept of number density by learning about the densities of different phases of water.  We calculated how much mass would be in a given volume of sample of each phase of water, appreciating the effect of phase on mass.  We then asked the question: how can we calculate the mass of a given amount of any particles of a substance?  To help answer that, we watched the Crash Course video below:

To end class, we learned how to use the periodic table to calculate mass of one mole of various molecules.

Class Notes:

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Class Notes from February 26:

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Extend Your Learning!

Interested in how scientists calculated the number of particles in one Mole?  Read about it at Wired Magazine.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 64 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 64.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 64 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th in Room 124)

Combined Gas Law

Having thoroughly explored gas laws involving two variables (Pressure & Volume, Pressure & Temperature, and Temperature and Volume), students were introduced to the Combined Gas Law, k=PV/T, at the end of class yesterday.  We began class with the video below:

Next, students received a copy of a handout designed to accompany the Deriving the Gas Laws activity packet from yesterday.  Students worked with their table partners to review, model, and explain the lab data.  The handout, due at the end of class, included a combined gas law practice problem.  Students had the remainder of the class period to:

  • Read Lesson 61 in the textbook and work through the practice exercises (assigned yesterday)
  • Complete the Lesson 61 worksheet handed out yesterday (due tomorrow, February 21)
  • Read Lesson 64 in the textbook and worth through the practice exercises.

We spent an extra day working through Combined Gas Law problems (class periods were short as a result of the Curriculum Fair).  We reviewed a few problems from the table on th efront of the Lesson 61 Worksheet, and we also worked through question 7 from a handout of additional Gas Law practice problems.  Class notes are shown below:

Example of volume solved at 5,000 ft from the L61 WS table
Explanation of Q8 from L61 WS

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 64 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 64.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 64 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  and meet regularly to review  concepts from class (meet in person, online, by phone, social media, etc)
  5. Attend MASH after school
  6. Attend Math Lab after school

Deriving the Gas Laws Lab

We returned from mid-winter break with a return to our work studying the gas laws.  Our exploration included a series of activities designed to guide students through the process of not only deriving the Gas Laws, but ultimately to derive the Ideal Gas Law constant, R.  For today’s work, students were tasked with collecting data from all three stations and then completing Part 1 of the packet as a team.  We completed Part 2 as a class, ultimately deriving the Combined Gas Law.  For homework, students took home a copy of the Lesson 61 Worksheet with the expectation that they will work through the Lesson 61 worksheet and return to school prepared to use the Combined Gas Law.  Students should also read through Lesson 61 in the textbook (see below) and work through the exercises at the end of the lesson for practice.  For additional help, check out the video below.  Reminders about more opportunities for help are provided at the bottom of this post.

Notes from class:

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Highly Recommended Video:

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 61 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 61.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 61 you do not yet fully understand.

Opportunities For Help Outside of Class:

  1. Mr. Swart’s office hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays after school until at least 3:00 (later with advanced notice)
  2. Use the vast number of resources available on this website – check each lesson!
  3. Email Mr. Swart for help if staying after school is not possible
  4. Form a study group with other students  to review concepts from class
  5. Attend MASH after school (M/T/Th in Library)
  6. Attend Math Lab after school (T/Th in Room 124)

Work Day

With Snowpocolypse on the horizon, rather than introduce the Combined Gas Law, students had the class period to complete unfinished assignments, practice the gas laws, or attempt the chemistry challenge.  For convenience, here are links to:

Notes from the whiteboard are shown below:

Please stay warm and safe this weekend.  If you or anyone you know needs help staying warm, please see the flyer below (distributed by Highline Public Schools Central Office).

Gas Pressure Lab

Our work today involves revisiting the gas pressure lab from last week (handout available in class), with an emphasis on:

  • Working efficiently in class
  • Cultivating relationships with new seat partners
  • Acquiring robust experimental data for each part of the activity (robust = pressure of >100 for each data point)
  • Average = (Trial 1 + Trial 2) / 2
  • Robust analysis that includes evidence obtained from the lab.  Keep asking yourself “why?” and then include “because” statements.  You have reached the limit of your understanding when you run out of “because” statements.

HHS Days of Respect Student Survey (2nd period) – Available in both English and Spanish

Bonus Learning (and Credit) Opportunities!

With more snow in the forecast, it is possible we will miss additional school days next week.  Here are a bunch of ways you can score bonus credit – up to and including dropping your first mini-quiz score!  Disclaimer: all work must be original, with sources cited using APA format (Citation Machine can help!)

  1. Make a video of one of the three Gas Pressure Lab activities.  Explain what the activity is modeling, how the data were collected, what the results were, and deeply analyze the results in the context of n, T, V, and P.  Videos must be posted to YouTube and the link emailed to Mr. Swart.  Quality video submissions will earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz (max of 3 people/team).  Winning videos will be linked to the class website and team members will have the option of bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  2. Make a poster of one of the four Gas Laws we have learned so far (Avogadro’s Law, Boyle’s Law, Charles’ Law, and Gay-Lussac’s Law).  Poster most include the name of the law, the equation, trends (example: as Pressure increases, Volume decreases), and an example problem with the solution.  The poster must be colorful and big enough for the name of the law and the equation to be seen from across the room.  Quality posters will earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz (max of 2 people/team).  Winning posters will be displayed in class and team members will have the option of bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  3. Get creative!  Write a piece of fiction, create a game, code a spreadsheet, paint a picture, you name it!   Explain one or more of the gas laws using your creativity to help make our work engaging for others.   Quality original work will be displayed in class and team members (3/group max) will have the option of adding 3 bonus points or dropping their mini-quiz score.
  4. Get analytical!  Find a moment from your life experience, your favorite book, movie, video game, etc.  Write at least one solid paragraph explaining the moment as it relates to one or more of the gas laws and earn +3 bonus points on the last mini-quiz.
  5. Investigate the scientists behind the gas laws.  Who were Avogadro, Boyle, Charles, and Gay-Lussac?  Write a brief biography of one or more of these scientists explaining  when and where they lived, what led them into science, how they discovered their laws, and what additional contributions they made to science.  Finally, explain at least one specific way that scientist’s gas law has improved our understanding of the world or contributed to a technological innovation.  Quality submissions earn +1 bonus point per scientist on the last mini-quiz.  Submissions must be your own writing and references must be cited using APA format to earn credit.  Need help with citations?  Try Citation Machine.