Gas Laws Simulation

Gas Laws Simulation

For our work today, students have the class period to complete their analysis of yesterday’s activity and then they can work in pairs to complete the Gas Laws Simulation and accompanying guided work packet.

Notes From Class:

Students received a handout with notes explaining how to convert between Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin (temperature units).  The answer key for the questions within the notes is shown below:

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Daily Deliverable Due Friday:

  • Gas Laws Simulation (packet)

Under Pressure – Introduction to Gas Laws

Exit Task

Our mini-unit began with a brief silent video introducing the Gas Laws.  Students were tasked with making written observations and then we held a class discussion and produced a chart of what they Know, Think They Know, and Need to Know.  Next, students were introduced to Robert Boyle, one of the great chemistry scientists from history who contributed greatly to our understanding of Gas Laws. The video can be accessed by clicking here and using the passcode provided in class.

The lesson concluded with an activity in which students worked in groups to simulate the movement of gas molecules, calculating how a change in variables (temperature, volume, and pressure) affects the rate of molecule collisions.

For the final 10 minutes of class, students completed the 1st Semester Reflection (Exit Task) and received back their graded Unit 2 Exam.


Updated 1/30 – For the second day of the lesson, we reviewed the gas laws and reviewed basic algebra skills to help prepare for making calculations with the gas laws.  Class notes are shown below, and the slide deck with important definitions covered thus far are available as a PowerPoint (unit 3 vocabulary).

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Daily Deliverables Due Friday:

  • Robert Boyle Video Notes (worksheet)
  • Gas Laws Lab Data and Analysis (worksheet)
  • 1st Semester Reflection (Exit Task)

Extend Your Learning!

Unit 2 Review

Notes from the January 22 review:

 


Day 2 Review:

Our review today consisted of a Kahoot! which covered the 20 multiple choice questions from the unit 2 review section in the textbook, followed by a review of functional group structures and smells.  Notes from the whiteboard are pictured below:

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Scientific Notation

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of scientific notation and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

  • Appendix A (pages A14-A16) in our textbook
  • Math Is Fun web page covering Scientific Notation

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for Scientific Notation

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for calculating numbers using Scientific Notation

Unit Conversions 2 – Scientific Notation and Significant Digits Gizmo with guided practice worksheet

Videos to review the concept of scientific notation:

SI Units of Measure / Dimensional Analysis

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of SI Units of Measure (also called the Metric System) and Dimensional Analysis (also called Unit Conversion), and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

  • Appendix A (pages A0-A1 for SI Units of Measure, and pages A16-17 for Dimensional Analysis) in our textbook
  • Math Is Fun web page covering the Metric System
  • Math is Fun web page covering Unit Conversion

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for Metric System Unit Conversion

Unit Conversions Gizmo (with guided practice worksheet)

Videos to review the concepts of SI Units of Measure and Dimensional Analysis (with practice problems):

Ratios and Proportions

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of ratios and proportions, and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

  • Appendix A (pages A11-A14) in our textbook
  • Math Is Fun web page covering Ratios
  • Math is Fun web page covering Proportions

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for understanding ratios

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for understanding proportions

PhET simulation for Ratios and Proportions

Part-to-part and Part-to-whole Ratios Gizmo (with guided practice worksheet)

Videos to review the concepts of ratios and proportions (with practice problems):

Averages and Graphing

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of calculating averages (also called the mean) and how to graph, and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

  • Appendix A (pages A7-A11) in our textbook
  • Math Is Fun web page covering Mean
  • Math is Fun game for practicing graphing coordinate pairs

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for graphing points on a coordinate plane

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for calculating the mean

PhET simulation for Graphing Lines

Videos to review the concepts of mean, median, and mode (with practice problems) and a review of graphing coordinate pairs:

Solving Equations / Order of Operations

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of how to solve equations and how to follow the rules for order of operations, and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

  • Appendix A (pages A3-A6) in our textbook
  • Math Is Fun web page covering Solving Equations
  • Math is Fun web page covering Order of Operations

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems for solving equations

Order of Operations Gizmo with guided practice worksheet

Videos to review the concepts of solving equations (with practice problems) and order of operations:

Accuracy, Precision, and Significant Digits

There are a variety of resources provide below to enhance your understanding of accuracy, precision, and significant digits (also called significant figures, or SigFigs), and plenty of opportunities to practice those skills.

Reading Resources (with practice problems):

Khan Academy section with videos and practice problems

Videos to review the concepts of accuracy and precision (TedEd) and two videos by Tyler DeWitt reviewing the concepts and working through practice problems:

Amino Acids and Proteins

The final lesson of Unit 2 explores how amino acids connect to make proteins.  The Lesson 48 PowerPoint includes the vocabulary terms of amino acid and protein.  Lesson 48 connects with Lesson 47, as amino acids are chiral molecules.  Notably, all of the 20 different amino acids in human proteins are “left-handed” (as opposed to the mirror-image “right-handed” isomers), meaning they all have the L conformation (L for laevus, Latin for “left”) rather than the D conformation (D for dexter, Latin for “right”).  Students will work in pairs to complete the Lesson 48 Worksheet, learning about the properties of amino acids and how they bind together to form proteins.  For more on the D and L convention, click on the picture below.

As noted previously, there are 20 different amino acids.  All amino acids share the same base structure of a central carbon atom bound to a carboxylic acid (-COOH), an amino group (-NH2), and a hydrogen (H).  The central carbon is also bound to an R group, with R indicating any one of the 20 different amino acid structures.  The structures each have different physical properties.  When individual amino acids link together, a polypeptide chain is formed (and a molecule of water is removed as each new amino acid is linked to the chain).  The polypeptide chain, composed of a string of amino acids, folds into a particular shape determined by the interactions of all of the amino acids.  The shape of a protein determines its function in the body.  Mr. Anderson of Bozeman Science has a fantastic video explaining the nature of proteins:

For students looking for a good review of Central Dogma (DNA > RNA > Protein > Trait), the Crash Course Biology video DNA, Hot Pockets, & The Longest Word Ever is a good resource:

Finally, for students with access to a home computer, the Fold.It website will have you folding proteins in no time!

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 48 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Write notes for Lesson 48 on the Chapter 9 Notes handout.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 48.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 48 you do not yet fully understand.