Lewis Dot Symbols

We extended our learning of the HONC 1234 rule from yesterday by re-introducing the concept of Lewis Dot Symbols and Structures.  The Lesson 31 PowerPoint includes key vocabulary, and we reviewed Lewis Dot Symbols and how they assemble to create Lewis Dot Structures in our class notes. Students had the remainder of the class period to work in groups of four on the  Lesson 31 Worksheet using the Lewis Dot Puzzle Pieces.   Students were reminded of the mini-quiz tomorrow covering content from Lessons 28-31.

Notes from class:

Remaining class time was utilized to read Lesson 31 in the textbook, summarizing the main ideas in the Chapter 6 Notes and working through the practice problems at the end of the lesson.

Keep Learning!

The videos below all include information about Lewis Dot symbols.  In preparation for the mini-quiz tomorrow, you are strongly encouraged to review them!

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 31 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Write notes for Lesson 31 on the Chapter 6 Notes handout.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 31.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 31 you do not yet fully understand.

Bonding Tendencies

In the Lesson 30 PowerPoint, students were introduced to the HONC 1234 rule.   We then worked together as a class on the first three problems of the Lesson 30 Worksheet and students had the remainder of the class period to complete the worksheet.

Notes from the whiteboard:

Remaining class time was utilized to read Lesson 30 in the textbook, summarizing the main ideas in the Chapter 6 Notes and working through the practice problems at the end of the lesson.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 30 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Write notes for Lesson 30 on the Chapter 6 Notes handout.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 30.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 30 you do not yet fully understand.

Structural Formulas

We continued our work from yesterday, beginning with the Lesson 29 PowerPoint.  After preparing for the lesson, students worked through the Lesson 29 worksheet which included another “wafting” lab in which two additional scents were provided for students to smell and connect with molecular formulas.  Students learned that two molecules can have the same molecular formula but smell very differently.  One compound smelled like rum extract, while an isomer of that compound smells like stinky cheese.  The compounds are isomers because they have the same chemical formula but different structural formula.  The lab further enabled students to make connections between compound names, molecular formulas, structural formulas, and smell.

Notes from the whiteboard:

Remaining class time was utilized to read Lesson 29 in the textbook, summarizing the main ideas in the Chapter 6 Notes and working through the practice problems at the end of the lesson.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 29 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Write notes for Lesson 29 on the Chapter 6 Notes handout.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 29.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 29 you do not yet fully understand.

Molecular Formulas

For our first lesson of Unit 2, students were asked to respond to the following entry task:

  • What do you think is happening when you smell something?
  • Why do you think we have a sense of smell?

After a class share-out, we worked through the Lesson 28 PowerPoint and then students all participated in an activity (guided by the  Lesson 28 Worksheet) where they smelled five different scents and then compared their observations as a class.  Based on the class results, students made connections between molecular formulas, chemical names, and scents (fishy, minty, or sweet).  Remaining class time was used to read and summarize Lesson 28 from the textbook.

Extend Your Learning!

While not necessarily related to smells, students are encouraged to check out the NASA InSight Mars Landing feed starting at 11:30 this afternoon.  InSight is scheduled to touch down on Mars at 11:47 AM PST (according to a recent article in Forbes).  On-demand video recordings will be available after the landing completes.

Homework:

  • Read Lesson 28 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Write notes for Lesson 28 on the Chapter 6 Notes handout.
  • Work through the practice problems at the end of Lesson 28.
  • Please ask questions about anything from Lesson 28 you do not yet fully understand.

Electroplating Metals

For our final lesson of Unit 1, the concept of electroplating metals was introduced by watching a short video featuring a garage-style setup with a guy who uses a spork and pickle juice to electroplate a part of his cart project:

After the video, we reviewed the Lesson 27 PowerPoint slide deck.  When we arrived at slide 7, students practiced the math skill of cross-multiplication to calculate how much of the materials in a 1.5 L stock solution are in a 200 mL sample of the stock solution.  Notes are provided below:

Students then received the Lesson 27 Worksheet and we worked through the front side, serving as the pre-lab for tomorrow.  An example of the marked up worksheet is shown below:


Update: 11/15 – We will be spending the day in the lab.  Students will work in groups of four, using the Electroplating Handout and the materials provided (1.5 V D-cell battery, battery holder, two aligator clips, beaker with 200 mL electroplating solution, and two nickels) to set up and conduct the lab.  Students who complete the lab efficiently will have the opportunity to extend their learning by modifying aspects of the lab using various teacher-supplied materials.

IMG_0105
Results of copper-plating nickel using a solution of copper sulfate, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid in water. Both nickel balls were connected to 9V battery and immersed in CuSO4 solution. Nickel ball connected to negative battery terminal had bubbles form on exterior, then became copper-coated over time. Nickel ball connected to positive terminal did not appear changed.

Update: 11/16 – To complete Lesson 27, students were challenged to complete the task outlined below, with a group lab report (due tomorrow) documenting the experience and explaining the learning:

IMG_0106
Copper coil connected to negative 9-volt battery terminal became partially zinc-coated (zinc connected to positive terminal) when immersed in acetic acid (vinegar) for 5 minutes.  Copper coil bubbled while zinc appeared unchanged during the experiment.

Homework for this week:

  • Read Lesson 27 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 27 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 27 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 27 on the Chapter 5 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 27 you do not yet fully understand.

Bonding

The Lesson 26 PowerPoint will introduce students to the four models of chemical bonding.  Students will also receive a handout of the models with additional information.  After the PowerPoint, students will work in pairs to organize the Substance Cards and record their learning on the Lesson 26 worksheet.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 26 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 26 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 26 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 26 on the Chapter 5 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 26 you do not yet fully understand.

Classifying Substances

We enter the final chapter in Unit 1 with the Lesson 25 PowerPoint, introducing students to the concept of classifying substances based on properties of matter like conductivity and solubility.  After slide 6 in the PowerPoint, students will receive the Lesson 25 Worksheet and then work in groups of 4 students to test the conductivity and solubility of the substances listed on the worksheet.  By the end of class, students will compile all of the data from the lab into the table on page 2 of the worksheet.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 25 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 25 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 25 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 25 on the Chapter 5 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 25 you do not yet fully understand.

Unit 1 Project Launch

Unit 1 Project

Background: With our first unit of chemistry nearly complete, consider all you have learned thus far.  Our initial review of matter (including mass, volume, and density) led to an introduction of the periodic table.  While researching an element for our class periodic table and your element profile project, we expanded our learning to include a brief history of atomic models, and a deeper dive into our current understanding of how atoms are constructed (protons, neutrons, and electrons) and how changing those particles impact an atom.  We learned that the elements are born in stars, with heavier elements forged in the explosive forces of supernovae, while unstable atoms experience decay over time.  We learned that neutrons decay into protons, protons decay into neutrons, and atoms can gain or lose electrons according to well-defined rules (main-group elements) and less-well-defined rules (transition metals).  We learned how to assemble ions into compounds, how to identify the metals in ionic compounds using the flame test, and how to write electron configurations of elements according to the number of electrons in subshells.

“The cosmos is within us.  We are made of star stuff.  We are a way for the universe to know itself.”

What does this quote mean to you?  Your assignment for this project is to unpack Carl Sagan’s famous quote, applying what you have learned during chemistry in unit 1 to your own effort to know yourself.

Deliverable: A well-written essay shared with Mr. Swart as a Google Doc

Due Date: Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Assignment Criteria:  Using the analogy of “If I were an atom…” explore what makes you who you are.

  • Chapter 1: What are your intensive and extensive properties? What makes you who you are and you don’t see changing over time (intensive properties)?  How have you changed over time, and what changes do you anticipate for yourself in the future (extensive properties)?
  • Chapter 2: Where does your name come from? What does your name mean to you?  What does your name mean to others?  What symbols best represent who you are and why?  Consider your reactivity: what gets you excited?  If you were an element on the periodic table, what group would you be in and why?
  • Chapter 3: Perception and reality are not always easy to align. Just like the way scientists have revised models of the atom over time to better reflect new experimental data, perceptions of who we are should be updated as well – by ourselves and by others.  Think about how well your teacher and classmates know the real you.  How well do you know the real you?  What are your most important parts (your metaphorical protons, neutrons, and electrons).  Share insights about yourself that are not obvious to someone who doesn’t know you well and would like to know you better.  What are your needs (fusion)?  What are your gifts to the world (particles shared through decay – let’s make decay a good thing!)?  What are your hopes and dreams, and how will they positively impact others (fission)?
  • Chapter 4: How will you own your future?  What do you intend to accomplish this year, five years from now, ten years from now?  Neutral atoms are fairly predictable – what do you see as your most likely path when you look to the future?  How about your path if you were an ion, able to clear out or add a few extra electrons and make life really interesting for yourself – what would that look like?

Grading: Your essay will be evaluated as a unit exam, a category that comprises 20% of your semester grade.  Incorporate as many Unit 1 vocabulary words as possible (highlight in bold font), in a manner that isn’t forced, to demonstrate mastery of the unit and a deep understanding of yourself.  I look forward to learning more about you!

Grading Rubric:

A B C D
Vocab Words (from chapter 1-4 notes) 20 or more 15-19 10-14 Less than 10
Content Self-reflection from all 4 chapters thoroughly explored Self-reflection from 3 chapters thoroughly explored Self-reflection from 2-3 chapters moderately explored Self-reflection surface-level or more than two chapters missing

 

Electron Configuration Gizmo

With the last few school days impacted by a string of fire alarm pulls, chemistry classes are out of sync. Our goal today is to bring classes back into alignment.  Our agenda is as follows:

  1. Complete Lesson 24
  2. Complete a brief survey on electron configurations
  3. Extend learning via the Electron Conguration Gizmo

Students who complete the Gizmo should head back to the Lesson 24 post from last week and review the videos on electron configuration and orbitals to fully round out the learning about this topic.

Electron Configurations

Our first order of business is for students to complete the isotopes post-assessment survey:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScY6iElS_QzLMhB6MQA90kzIb1P79169GOBdUL_jqy9ACTzvg/viewform?usp=sf_link

After taking the survey, we returned to focusing our attention to electrons, culminating  with Lesson 24.  Class notes are shown below:

Student had the remainder of the class period to read Lesson 24 in the textbook to better help them understand the concept of sub-shells.  Students are encouraged to watch the Crash Course chemistry video below as optional homework.

For Friday’s lesson, we will work through the Lesson 24 PowerPoint followed by the Lesson 24 Worksheet.  Students will gain additional practice with electron configurations on Monday through the electron configuration Gizmo.

Keep Learning!

Extend your learning with additional videos focusing on electron orbitals and electron configurations.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 24 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 24 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 24 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 24 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 24 you do not yet fully understand.