Transition Metal Chemistry

Today we learned about how to name compounds that involve transition metals.  To help launch the lesson, students watched a video by Tyler DeWitt titled Transition Metals in Ionic Formulas:

After watching the first video, we practiced writing ionic formulas with transition metals via the Lesson 23.1 worksheet.

Extend your learning!

Students are encouraged to review lesson content by watching the videos below:

Real-world application:

Click on the image below to learn more about how transition metals are used in the process of coloring paint.

Chemistry-of-Inorganic-Paint-Pigment-Compounds

Next, click on the image below to learn how transition metals impact the color of gemstones:

The-Chemistry-of-Gemstone-Colours-2016

What do you notice about the two different images?  How can different transition metals turn different materials (paint and gemstones) similar colors?  How do similar chemical formulas result in different colors?  To help answer this, consider the difference between paint and gemstones: you light observes light reflected by both substances.  Does light interact with paint and gemstones differently?

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 23 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 23 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 23 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 23 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 23 you do not yet fully understand.

Polyatomic Ions

For lesson 22, students continued to explore ionic bonds, this time in the context of polyatomic ions.  We worked through the Lesson 22 PowerPoint and then students used the class period to practice creating and naming polyatomic ions and their chemical formulas by playing two different card games and then recording their learning on the Lesson 22 Worksheet.


Update: October 31, 2018: Notes from the Lesson 21/22 review are posted below.  Apologies to my 6th period students who lost an entire class period of learning after the three fire alarm pulls that occurred during that period, disrupting an hour of class for nearly 1200 students at our school.


Students are encouraged to review lesson content by watching the videos below:

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 22 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 22 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 22 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 22 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 22 you do not yet fully understand.

Formulas for Ionic Compounds

To help remind students of what we were studying prior to the Friday mini-quiz, we began class with the entry task question: What elements will combine with strontium, Sr, in a 1:1 ratio? Explain your thinking.

We then reviewed select problems from the back of the Lesson 20 worksheet before moving on to the process of creating and naming ionic compounds through the game Salty Eights.  Working in groups of four, students used the game pieces to play the game, recording the compound names and formulas  on the Lesson 21 Worksheet.

For additional support writing ionic formulas, students are encouraged to watch the video below:

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 21 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 21 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 21 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 21 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 21 you do not yet fully understand.

Ionic Compounds

We extended our learning about ions to the study of ionic compounds, reviewing Lesson 17-19 content in preparation for the mini-quiz tomorrow.  We then worked through the Lesson 20 PowerPoint which included the vocabulary terms of cation and anion and learning about how different numbers of anions and cations combine by following the Rule of Zero Charge.  Students received a handout containing common ions and their charges to use as a resource, and we worked through the first few problems on the back of the Lesson 20 Worksheet.  Students should continue working on the Lesson 20 worksheet after the mini-quiz tomorrow and this weekend as time permits.  We will review a selection of the problems from the worksheet on Monday.

Homework for this evening:

  • Review Lesson 17-19 content and prepare one (teacher-provided) note card of notes to use on the mini-quiz.
  • Read Lesson 20 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 20 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 20 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 20 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class Monday prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 20 you do not yet fully understand.

Ions

Our learning about electrons continued with the Lesson 19 PowerPoint introducing students to the concept of ions.  Students received the Noble Gas Envy handout and we walked through the example on the overhead:

IMG_0076

For classwork, students received the Lesson 19 Worksheet and the Ion Cards Game Cards that accompanies it.  Students worked in small groups to complete the back side of the worksheet.

For extra help, the video below will review ions:

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 19 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 19 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 19 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 19 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class Monday prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 19 you do not yet fully understand.

Valence and Core Electrons

We briefly reviewed the Lesson 17 PowerPoint before transitioning to the Lesson 18 PowerPoint.  There are several hand-outs for Lesson 18, including the Lesson 18 Worksheet, the Lesson 18 Shell Model, the Table of Electron Shells, and the Table of Valence and Core Electrons.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 18 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 18 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 18 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 18 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class Monday prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 18 you do not yet fully understand.

Flame Tests Lab

After conducting the flame tests lab, we will construct a data table of flame tests results.  Time permitting, we will review the Lesson 17 PowerPoint and begin discussing the analysis questions from the Flame Test Lab.

Note: Students who missed the Flame Test Lab may work through the Virtual Flame Test Lab on Scratch and then use the learning to work through the analysis questions.

The video below demonstrates the results of a flame test lab involving compounds with potassium (K), copper (Cu), sodium (Na), and strontium (Sr).  Use your observations from the flame test lab you conducted with unknown metals (X, A, D, E) and try to decode the unknowns using the results of the flame test lab in the video.

Whiteboard Notes:

IMG_0072IMG_0073

Homework for this evening:

  • Complete the Flame Test Lab analysis questions.
  • Read Lesson 17 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 17 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 17 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 17 on the Chapter 4 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything from Lesson 17 you do not yet fully understand.

Flame Tests Pre-Lab

After the modified lock-down this morning impacting class times, out of fairness to all of my students, I decided to postpone the Chapter 3 test to tomorrow and instead guide students through the Lesson 17 Flame Test Pre-Lab.

First, we watched the video below so students could better understand what the lab would entail:

Next, students read the Flame Test Lab procedure and then answered the pre-lab questions.  Students also received the Chapter 4 Notes and had the remainder of the class period to read through Lesson 17 in the textbook and work on the notes.

Formation of Elements

To begin class, students were asked to share out a response to the question: where do the elements come from?  After a brief discussion, we watched the video below:

Next, we worked through the PowerPoint to learn more about the concepts of fusion and fission, and then students used the remainder of class to work on the Lesson 16 Worksheet.  This is the final textbook lesson of Chapter 3.  On Monday, we will continue our exploration of nuclear reactions with a Gizmo activity in preparation for the Chapter 3 test next Wednesday.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 16 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 16 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 16 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 16 on the Chapter 03 Notes handout.
  • Come to class Monday prepared to ask questions about anything from Chapters 1-3 you did not yet fully understand.