Element Profile Project

For your assigned element, research the following information:

All sources must be cited.  Only include information from credible scientific sources.  If unsure, ask!

Collect all of this information into a Google Slides and share with Mr. Swart.


Updated: October 9 – Our collection of completed element profiles is growing!  Please visit the Element Profiles page and check out the slide decks of the elements in the periodic table.  


Homework

Study for the Chapter 2 test on Friday.  Make sure to complete your Chapter 02 Notes to use on the test.

The Periodic Table

Class began with a video about Dmitri Mendeleev and the Periodic Table.  During the video, students received their graded Chapter 1 Tests.  Students were encouraged to review the answer key as needed.  Students who struggled on the density questions (#13-15) on the test may obtain full credit for those three problems upon successful completion of the Density Laboratory Gizmo packet.  The complete packet must be returned along with the test for credit.

Next, students went back to work in small groups, tackling the Lesson 10 worksheet with their groups from Lesson 9.  They reconstructed their periodic tables using the cards from Lesson 9, then identified trends in the table to fill in the worksheet.  After completing the worksheet, students received a paper copy of the Periodic Table to use on exams and quizzes and then had the remainder of the class period to read and take notes on lesson 10 using the textbook as well as the Power Point slides.

CI-Simple-Periodic-Table-of-the-Elements-2018-768x543

Bonus Learning Opportunity

For pleasure, students should consider reading a few pages from Sam Kean’s book titled The Disappearing Spoon.  Click this link for the section of the book about Ytterby Lanthanides.  It begins with the sentence “In 1701, a braggadocian teenager…” and you will need to click the hyperlinked blue “Page >>” in the upper left hand corner to reveal the full reading passage.  Continue reading through the next three full pages ending in “…Galapagos Island of the periodic table.”  You will be glad you did!

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 10 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 10 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 10 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 10 on the Chapter 02 Notes handout.
  • Answer the Lesson 10 questions in the Chapter 2 Study Guide.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything of the homework problems from lesson 10 you did not understand.

Properties of the Elements

We began our exploration of the Periodic Table by constructing our own.  In Lesson 9, students walk the path of the famous Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev who assembled the first predictive periodic table using the chemical and physical properties of the 63 elements known back in the 1860s.  We began the lesson with a video showing the reactivity of alkali metals upon contact with water:

For our work today, we reviewed the Lesson 9 PowerPoint, then worked through the Lesson 9 Worksheet by organizing elements via a card sort activity.

Extend Your Learning!

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lesson 9 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 9 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 09 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 9 on the Chapter 02 Notes handout.
  • Answer the Lesson 9 questions in the Chapter 2 Study Guide.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything of the homework problems from lesson 9 you did not understand.

Chemical Names and Symbols

For our first lesson of Chapter 2, students took notes from the Lesson 6 PowerPoint to introduce students to chemical names and symbols.  Students then had the remainder of the class period to make observations about 18 test tubes containing various chemical elements and compounds and filling in the table in their Lesson 6 worksheet.

Homework for this evening:

  • Read Lessons 6-8 in the textbook.  Login via hs.saplinglearning.com and enter your username and password:
    • Username: wahps****s-####### (**** = first 4 letters of your last name and ####### = student number).  Remember to include the dash between s and #.
    • Password: S-####### (the S must be capitalized)
  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 6 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 06 Homework Answers.
  • Answer the Lesson 6 questions in the Chapter 2 Study Guide.
  • Write notes for Lessons 6-8 on the Chapter 02 Notes handout.
  • Come to class Monday prepared to ask questions about anything of the homework problems from lesson 6 you did not understand.

Chapter 1 Review

Today students will receive login credentials for online access to our Living By Chemistry textbook.  Students will access the book through the Sapling Learning website.

In preparation for the Chapter 1 Test tomorrow, students will have the class period to complete and review their Chapter 01 NotesThis handout may be used as notes on the test.  No other notes may be used.  Students may not share notes during the test. The notes must be turned in along with the test tomorrow. Students should also review Mini-Quiz 1 and ask clarifying questions as needed.

Whiteboard notes depicting the solution for Lesson 5 Worksheet question 13:

IMG_0028

In addition, students should prepare for the test by working through the Chapter 1 Summary questions on page 21 of the textbook.  Chapter 01 Summary answers are provided for students to check their work after attempting the review exercises.

As a final reminder (as included in the Chapter 1 Study Guide provided to students last Friday), testable content from Chapter 1 may include:

  • Syllabus
  • Safety Contract
  • Lesson 1-5 content and vocabulary (review end-of-lesson exercises!)
    • Explain where to locate and how to use lab safety equipment
    • Review lab equipment Google Slides
    • Review Penny Lab demonstration – did the penny turn to gold?
    • Explain how you know what is and is not matter
    • Explain how to measure mass and volume
    • Calculate density when given mass and volume
    • Calculate mass when given density and volume
    • Calculate volume when given density and mass
    • Explain how density can be used as evidence to support what a material is or is not
    • Understand the limitations of density
    • Use common metric system prefixes (milli-, centi-, and kilo-) and base units (m, L, g)

Density

Our work today uses the concepts of mass and volume from lesson 4 and connects them into a formula used to describe a physical property of matter: density.  We can calculate density using the equation density = mass / volume.  Students should come away with an understanding of what density is and how it can be used to provide evidence in support of the identity of a substance.  Students should also recognize the limitations of density in making such a determination.

We will begin the lesson with the ChemCatalyst from the Lesson 05 PowerPoint.  Students will learn the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic properties of matter, and then they will work in pairs to complete the Lesson 05 Student Worksheet.  Students who complete the worksheet will have the remainder of the class period to practice calculating the densities of various materials.

Notes from class:

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Homework for this evening:

  • Work through the homework problems at the end of Lesson 5 and then verify accuracy with the Lesson 05 Homework Answers.
  • Write notes for Lesson 5 on the Chapter 01 Notes handout.
  • Come to class tomorrow prepared to ask questions about anything of the homework problems from lesson 5 you did not understand.
  • Continue working on the Chapter 1 Study Guide.

Extend Your Learning!

According to Ptable.com, the density of gold is 19,300 kg/m³.  According to your textbook, the density of gold is 19.3 g/cm³.  Use dimensional analysis to connect the densities, given that there are 1,000 grams in 1 kilogram (1,000 g = 1 kg) and 1,000,000 cm³ in 1 m³.  The video below can help you through the process: